Egyptian government reopens the world’s oldest pyramid 

Egyptian government reopens the world’s oldest pyramid 

The government of Egypt has reopened the oldest pyramid in Egypt, which was named after one of their kings - ‘Djoser’. The pyramid is considered to b

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The government of Egypt has reopened the oldest pyramid in Egypt, which was named after one of their kings – ‘Djoser’. The pyramid is considered to be the world’s oldest monumental stone building to the public.

Sometime in 2006, the Egyptian government started a project to rebuild the structure, following decades of abandonment and the risk of collapse. 

Located in the Saqqara funeral complex – under the rule of king Djoser – outside the royal capital of Memphis, the ancient pyramid is 60 meters tall. 

The Djoser Pyramid consists of multifaceted halls and courts which were constructed during the time of the second king of the third dynasty of ancient Egypt – King Djoser – whose sarcophagus has been restored. 

The Egypt step pyramid of Djoser comprises of six stacked steps over a burial shaft tomb that is 28 meters deep and seven meters wide. Also, it’s made solely of stone and built of six stacked terraces.

The pyramid, which is about 4,700 years old is said to be a UNESCO World Heritage site. 

“It is the first building in the world made with only stone”, Antiquities and Tourism Minister Khaled El-Enany said during the reopening.

Imhotep was described as the architect of the ancient pyramid. According to some of the world’s foremost architects, Imhotep was a priest – vizier to King Djose – a physician, poet, astronomer, mathematician and an architect.

According to reports from the state, the restoration cost $6.6 million, which includes the refurbishment of the ancient site, collapsed ceiling blocks, a burial chamber and corridors.

More so, new lighting system and disabled access were installed as part of the restoration. In addition, there are hieroglyphs from the Book of the Dead inscribed on one of the chamber’s walls

That said, tourists would not have to view the ancient pyramid from distance out of fear of collapsing, as it has been commissioned as an Egyptian tourist center.