I Was Tempted to Quit My Musical Career, Patoranking

I Was Tempted to Quit My Musical Career, Patoranking

Popular reggae and dancehall singer, Patrick Nnaemeka Okorie, known as Patoranking, struggled so hard to rise to stardom. Even after releasing his fi

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Popular reggae and dancehall singer, Patrick Nnaemeka Okorie, known as Patoranking, struggled so hard to rise to stardom. Even after releasing his first five singles, the fame refused to come. His first five tracks were ‘Upon the Club’, So Nice’, ‘Tonight’, ‘Park Well’, ‘Iya Bisi’, which he recorded under K-Solo’s Igeraga Records. Not until the release of his hit track, ‘Alubarika’, which featured Timaya, did he acquire fame and fortune.

The ‘Girlie O’ crooner is set to drop his next album titled ‘Wilmer’. Patoranking made known to the public how his hit track ‘Alubarika’ changed his fortunes as a musician.

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“Alubarika taught me to be even more challenged to succeed. It made me hungry for success and curious to learn the things required to be the best I can be”, he said.

According to Patoranking, before the release of ‘Alubarika’, he almost gave up his musical career, but was determined to push harder to succeed.

“There were moments I was tempted to quit my musical career. But they were just flashes because I focused more on the possibilities than the reasons I should quit. I knew what I wanted to do with my life, and was bent on succeeding at it”, he highlighted.

He explained that at the time the fame came, he was expecting it. “Yes, I was expecting it because I had not only prayed about it. I realized that through my lyrics, I had prophesied it into existence”.

Speaking further, the reggae singer who once described his songs as “a morally inclined variation of reggae/dancehall music”, explained why ‘Daniella Whine’, ‘Girlie O’, ‘Suh Different’ and ‘Available’ seems not to fall within that description.

“Music from my perspective is a spirit and a painting. Like all paintings, it contains various colors and different expressions explain the vibe it has. So also, these specific songs were for the portrayal of the vibe behind the inspiration of the songs. It was about dance and I decided to choose the physical feminine expression of it to connect with my female fans. Also, I wanted to appreciate how cool they interpret rhythm and sounds”, he added.